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What does the word Parthenon mean?

The name Parthenon derives from one of Athena’s many epithets: Athena Parthenos, meaning Virgin. Parthenon means ‘house of Parthenos’ which was the name given in the 5th century BCE to the chamber inside the temple which housed the cult statue. … From the 4th century BCE the whole building acquired the name Parthenon.

What was the purpose of the Parthenon?

Importance of the Parthenon The Parthenon was the center of religious life in the powerful Greek City-State of Athens, the head of the Delian League. Built in the 5 century B.C., it was a symbol of the power, wealth and elevated culture of Athens.

What is a synonym for Parthenon?

noun. The main temple of the goddess Athena; built on the acropolis in Athens more than 400 years B.C.; example of Doric architecture. Synonyms. Athens capital of Greece Athinai Greek capital. Etymology.

Is the Parthenon inside the Acropolis?

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon.

Are they restoring the Parthenon?

Greece’s Central Archaeological Council has announced its major decision to reconstruct the northern wall of the cella (or chamber) of the Parthenon in Athens, completing restoration works that have lasted for over three decades.

Who were slaves in Athens?

Athenian slaves were the property of their master (or of the state), who could dispose of them as he saw fit. He could give, sell, rent, or bequeath them. A slave could have a spouse and child, but the slave family was not recognized by the state, and the master could scatter the family members at any time.

What race were Greek slaves?

It varied by city state, most of Sparta’s population were hereditary slaves. Most slaves were prisoners of war (mostly against other Greek city states or in their colonial expansion) or were debtors or convicts. There were also imported “barbarians” either by trade or the wars that weren’t against their fellow Greeks.

Where did Athenian slaves come from?

Slavery was common in antiquity, and the Athenians used thousands of slaves in their private homes, factories, and mines, and also as civil servants. Slaves were usually captured in war and came from all over the Mediterranean, including other Greek cities.

Did the Spartans have slaves?

Spartan Society The population of Sparta consisted of three main groups: the Spartans, or Spartiates, who were full citizens; the Helots, or serfs/slaves; and the Perioeci, who were neither slaves nor citizens. … Spartan men devoted their lives to military service, and lived communally well into adulthood.

What were slaves in Sparta called?

They were the helots, the subjugated and conquered people, the slaves of Sparta. Nobody knows exactly what the term “Helot” actually means. Some say it came from the village called Helos that was conquered by the angry Spartans.

What is Sparta called today?

Modern day Sparta, the capital of the prefecture of Lakonia, lies on the eastern foothills of Mount Taygetos in the Evrotas River valley. The city has been built upon the site of ancient Sparta, whose Acropolis lies north of the modern city. To the southwest stands Mt. Taygetos.

What are the cons of Spartan society?

Pros of Sparta Pros of Athens
Cons of Sparta Cons of Athens
-abandoned sick children -age 7 – military training -few freedoms -no education -slavery -not all people equal -tyrants -women not citizens -no formal education for girls -peasants, merchants, and artisans resented nobles -nobles could take land from peasants

What was bad about Sparta?

Surrender in battle was the ultimate disgrace. Spartan soldiers were expected to fight without fear and to the last man. Surrender was viewed as the epitome of cowardice, and warriors who voluntarily laid down their arms were so shamed that they often resorted to suicide.

What caused Athens to lose Peloponnesian War?

What contributed to Athens losing the Peloponnesian War? – Athens was overcrowded, and a plague spread through the city. – The death of Pericles led the Spartans to attack Athens directly. – The Spartans successfully broke through the walls around Athens.

What was one effect of the Peloponnesian War?

Impact of the Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War marked the end of the Golden Age of Greece, a change in styles of warfare, and the fall of Athens, once the strongest city-state in Greece. The balance in power in Greece was shifted when Athens was absorbed into the Spartan Empire.

What caused the fall of Sparta?

The most serious, however was the crisis caused by the earthquake which in 464 BC devastated Sparta, costing many lives. In the immediate aftermath, the helots saw an opportunity to rebel. This was followed by the siege of Ithome which the rebel helots had fortified.

Why did Sparta fight Athens?

The Peloponnesian War is the name given to the long series of conflicts between Athens and Sparta that lasted from 431 until 404 BC. … However, the more immediate reason for the war was Athenian control of the Delian League, the vast naval alliance that allowed it to dominate the Mediterranean Sea.

What culture region was an ally of Sparta?

Sparta was leader of an alliance of independent states that included most of the major land powers of the Peloponnese and central Greece, as well as the sea power Corinth.

Who attacked first in the Peloponnesian War?

Historians have traditionally divided the war into three phases. In the first phase, the Archidamian War, Sparta launched repeated invasions of Attica, while Athens took advantage of its naval supremacy to raid the coast of the Peloponnese and attempt to suppress signs of unrest in its empire.

Who won the Persian War?

Greeks

What ended the Peloponnesian War?

Learning from its past experiences with the Athenian navy, they established a fleet of warships. It would be another decade of warfare before the Spartan general Lysander defeated the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami. This defeat led to Athenian surrender. As a result, the Peloponnesian War was concluded.

Why did Athens and Sparta agree to a 30 year peace treaty?

The purpose of the treaty was to prevent another outbreak of war. Ultimately, the peace treaty failed in achieving its goal, with the outbreak of the Second Peloponnesian War in 431 BCE. … The Thirty Years’ Peace, however, lasted only fifteen years and ended after the Spartans had declared war on the Athenians.

How did Athens fall?

In 338 BC the armies of Philip II defeated Athens at the Battle of Chaeronea, effectively limiting Athenian independence.

When did Persia invade Greece?

492 BC – 490 BC