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Is all vinyl toxic?

Polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl) is the most toxic plastic for our health and the environment. Vinyl plastic products expose children and all of us to harmful chemical additives such as phthalates, lead, cadmium and organotins — all substances of very high concern. …

Why is vinyl called wax?

This was electroplated to make the metal parts to stamp finished records. Hence, for almost the first 50 years of recorded sound, including cylinders, wax was the media that took the original sound waves. Therefore the term “wax” came into popular use as slang for a record.

Why are vinyls black?

Carbon has conductive properties, so adding it to the PVC increases the overall conductivity of the material, lessening the accumulation of static, and therefore, dust, on a record. By coloring records black with carbon-based pigment, manufacturers ensure their records last longer and sound better.

What does wax mean in music?

the culture. “ Wax” as a verb means to speak enthusiastically, as many lyricists do in their rhymes. “ Wax” as a noun is a euphemism for vinyl, the original means that Hip‐Hop music was delivered upon. Now, Hip‐

Is my record a 33 or 45?

12″ records that are albums (>20 minutes per side) are 33, 12″ records that are singles may be 33 if they are from the US or 45 if they are from Europe. 10″ records are usually 33, but there may be 45 as well. It is printed on the label.

Why are some records 33 and some 45?

Ultimately, RCA released the format in order to directly compete with the Columbia Record 33. The 45 of the time did not provide much in terms of an advantage over 78s, and Columbia’s system could play both 33 and 78, so few manufacturers picked up on the 45s. … The faster a record spins, the better it sounds.

Can you skip songs on vinyl?

A very common question that comes up frequently is this one: “Can I skip tracks on vinyl?” The plain and simple answer to that is: Yes. You can skip tracks on vinyl records.

Does vinyl sound better?

Because of their materiality, records offer sound qualities that digital formats do not. These include warmth, richness, and depth. Many people value those qualities and so hold vinyl records to sound better than digital formats.