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How was Acropolis destroyed?

In 480 B.C., the Persians attacked again and burned, leveled and looted the Old Parthenon and almost every other structure at the Acropolis. To prevent further losses, the Athenians buried the remaining sculptures inside natural caves and built two new fortifications, one of the rock’s north side and one on its south.

What are the Elgin Marbles and why are they so controversial?

Why the controversy? The sculptures are the subject of one of the longest cultural rows in Europe. The Greeks have demanded that they be returned to their homeland. Greece maintains they were taken illegally during the country’s Turkish occupation and should be returned for display in Athens.

Why Greece should get the Elgin marbles back?

The legality of the statues is still highly disputed between the U.K. and Greece, with Greek officials arguing that due to the Ottoman’s occupation, the decree was not valid and the Ottomans had no authority over the Parthenon, therefore the marbles should be returned to Athens.

What was Athens greatest enemy?

Sparta and Athens fought a long war, called the Peloponnesian War, from 431 to 404BC. Only the threat of invasion by a foreign enemy made the Greeks forget their quarrels and fight on the same side. Their biggest enemy were the Persians, who came from an area around modern day Iran.

What is Athena the god of?

Athena, also spelled Athene, in Greek religion, the city protectress, goddess of war, handicraft, and practical reason, identified by the Romans with Minerva. … She was essentially urban and civilized, the antithesis in many respects of Artemis, goddess of the outdoors.

Who killed Heracles?

In the play Herakles by Euripides, Heracles is driven to madness by Hera and kills his children after his twelve labours.

Why was Athena a virgin?

In her aspect as a warrior maiden, Athena was known as Parthenos (Παρθένος “virgin“), because, like her fellow goddesses Artemis and Hestia, she was believed to remain perpetually a virgin. Athena’s most famous temple, the Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis, takes its name from this title.